Tips for Landing the Perfect Writing Internship

Hey everyone. Due to the holiday and writers block I’ve been absent for a bit, but as usual I’ll try to stay current. Today’s topic: landing that writing internship that all of us college students want. 

Recently, I was accepted as an intern by a local branch of a major TV station. Just six months ago, I had to quit my shady online internship after four months. As writing majors, there aren’t as many options as other majors. It was tough for me to land this amazing internship. Hopefully with these tips, you’ll have an easier time than I do. 

1. Be Wary of Online-Only Internships 

Call me bias, but after what happened with my scam of an internship with University Primetime, I would suggest being wary of online companies. However, some people have a different experience. One of my classmates really enjoys his online internship. 

If you really want to go with an online internship, make sure that you’ve read through their website thoroughly and that they’re a company you want to work with. If you have any doubts, look elsewhere. 

2. Don’t Back Away Just Becuase It’s Unpaid

Sometimes the best reward isn’t cash, it’s experience! If you see a company that looks awesome but doesn’t pay, don’t worry. There’s always a possibility that your unpaid position could lead to a job in the future. 

3. Go to an Internship Fair

I never went to my school’s internship fair because I thought the companies there were only looking for business or finance majors. I took a leap of faith this year, but on my business professional wear, and went to every single table in the room asking if they needed a writer, editor, journalist, or blogger. To my surprise, the very first table I went to said, “Yes! We do!” When I looked down, it was the TV station. 

4. Don’t Underestimate Your Skills

One of my favorite sayings is “Everyone needs a writing major.” And it’s true! We can write, edit, are great at deadlines, and we’re masters of social media. I thought the TV station would be looking for communications, film, or even AD/PR majors. I was wrong. So don’t be afraid to go up to the table of the company that you think doesn’t want you. Chances are that they may actually do. 

5. Totally Nail Your Interview

This one is easier said than done. I’ll elaborate on this more in my next post, but a few simple tips are familiarizing yourself with the company, dressing for success, and having questions ready for the end of the interview. 

How it Feels to (Kind Of) get a Shout Out From John Green

Photo courtesy of John Green’s Twitter

It’s only been two days, and I feel like this is already old news. I was going to publish this yesterday, and I had the whole entire post written except for the featured image, but, thanks to the school wifi, I wasn’t able to post it and it didn’t save a draft.

So, anyway, the other day I was scrolling down my Facebook feed when I saw a picture of John Green pretending to look like the guy from the movie “Her.” There was also a screenshot of a comment on this picture. A user, known as TheAutisticGuitarist, commented on YouTube, “I loved you in ‘Her.'” That user is Desmond, my boyfriend.

So I really love John Green, saw the movie “Her”, and am the girlfriend of the guy who got the shout out. That counts as “kind of” right? And just in case there are any doubts (because let’s face it, it’s really easy to make this kind of thing up), here is a picture of Desmond and I last Halloween, where he is wearing the same hat as he is in is YouTube profile picture.

des halloween

When I found this out, I called Desmond immediately and told him. When he saw Green’s post, he didn’t freak out like I did. He laughed and just thought the whole thing was a big joke. A world famous author mentioned him on social media, and he was laughing.

So this just goes to show that any normal day can turn into something extraordinary. You could just be sitting on the couch and all of a sudden your boyfriend gets mentioned in a post by John Green.

Things You Definitely Shouldn’t do if You Want Beta Readers

After four days of completing my first round of edits on my story Knowing You’re There, I am on to the next step in the publishing process: getting beta readers. While I’d love to have a great post for you guys about how successful I’ve been, I have the exact opposite. So, I’ll use my failed attempts to have a laugh and help you guys as well.

So here are five things to NOT do in the process of finding beta readers:

1. Ask Your Friends

This so far just hasn’t been successful for me. If my friends were in the writing field, not busy college students, and were being paid, you would probably have more luck.

2. Ask Your Relatives

I just haven’t even attempted this one after my past outcomes. Three years ago, all I asked my sister for Christmas was to read my short novella Euphoria on Wattpad. I gave her three months to read the 80 page book. Instead, I got a Spongebob DVD. My mom has not read a sentence of Saving Flight 926, the book I started in January.

3. Beg

If your current beta readers aren’t committed, they’re still not going to do it, even when you beg. If they’re busy or uninterested, they’re not going to do it.

4. Not Explain Your Deadlines

While I’m not a beta reader expert and really am kicking myself for not researching more on the topic, surely everyone needs a time where their beta readers should be finished. If you don’t give them a deadline, they may think they’ll have unlimited time. I literally just explained this to my boyfriend, who had no idea.

Finishing Edits…but Are They Really Done? 

Hello all. I’ve Ben away for a while, mainly because of schoolwork and the fact that I wasn’t really doing anything writing related. I had only 15 pages left of edits for my novel Knowing You’re There, and I finally finished that, along with formatting the whole thing and putting it into a Google doc for beta readers, which is a whole different story in itself, because when I told everyone I was starting my publishing journey they were all volunteering, and now everyone is either not interested or too busy. 

Anyway, the focus from the beginning was always the length of my story. I managed to increase the word count from 42K to 46K with a few new scenes. However, that’s still not enough. So I found myself suddenly making an outline of 7 chapters that would definitely not be fluff and would actually further plot and character development for Kurt and Lia, my starring couple. 

Now the big question is: do I go through with it? A large part of me thinks I should. However, I’m a tired and lazy college student. But since a novel is trimmed down anyway I the professional editing process, I’m going to say that it would be a good idea to extend it. Now all I need to do is find some committed beta readers who will work for free…