Ten Things Every Writer Wants for Christmas

Hi everyone! I normally go in to detail about my posts, but this one is pretty self-explainitory. So here are ten things that are on every writers’ (or at least this writer’s) wishlist. 

1. A Publication

This is a no brainer and pretty obvious. Every one of us has that deep desire to see our name in print. 

2. A Distraction-Free Workspace

I, like many other writers, have trouble focusing on my work. It would be nice to have a quiet space to just let inspiration happen. 

3. A Cure for Writer’s Block

Becuase it can seriously be the worst thing ever at times. 

4. To Actually Finish Our Work

I’m usually a quick book-writer, but sometimes things just take so long. 

5. More Social Media Followers

We all see professionals doing what they love and having thousands of followers. It would be nice if Santa could bring those to all my social media pages. 

6. Hearing Back from all of our Submissions

A lot of us are constantly in the process of writing and submitting pieces, which causes an eternal waiting process. It would be great to have some good answers this holiday season. 

7. A Job in Our Field

Keep your heads up, college writing majors! 

8. Financial Stability

For writers going back and forth with freelance jobs or short contacts deals, making ends meet as a writer can be tough. 

9. Writing-Themed Accessories

Really, who doesn’t love a cute journal to scribble down ideas, fancy pens, etc? 

10. People to Actually Read our Stuff

Sometimes we can have a lot of followers, but not a lot of people actively reading a critiquing our work. If you have a family member or friend who is a writer, ask to read some of their work. I guarantee, it’ll be one of the best gifts you can give them. 

Time Traveling Through Your Old Stories

Last night I was snowed in and bored here in the Northeast. I thought it would be entertaining to read a book that I haven’t touched in years. I settled on my fantasy story Euphoria that I finished back in 2012, when I was 18. Back then, it was my only story that didn’t receive good reviews. I couldn’t figure out why. I created a whole different world and had a main character that was vastly different from anyone else I’d seen. 

Now, after finishing my writing degree, I caught on to every mistake, every repeated word, every time I told instead of showed. In a way it was completely embarrassing. People had to sit through and suffer through chapters of repetitive facts, info dumps, and my main character, Violet, who had to tell readers multiple times that yes, she was smaller than everyone else. 

I guess the main point of this is that we shouldn’t feel ashamed of our own stories,and we shouldn’t be scared to go back and read them (a problem that I’ve always had). Our old stories show how much we’ve grown as authors. They’re part of our journey to achieve whatever it is we want to do in the writing world. Back in the day, I was extremely proud of Euphoria, And I still am. 

Of course, now reading it had inspired me to go back and update all my old books, but that’s a project for another time. 

A Form of Denial

Hey everyone! Normally I don’t make rant posts, but after something that happened to me yesterday and becuase I’m having trouble thinking of weekly posts, I’ll make an exception. 

Anyone who knows me would know how much I love Wattpad.com. I’ve been using the website for almost six years and just about everything I’ve ever written can be found there. However, one of my favorite parts of the site is the Clubs, multiple different groups where people can chat and offer their services for critiques, editing, etc. 

I’ve always relied on the Multimedia Designs club to find some great cover artists. That’s what I did yesterday, just trying to get someone to change the wording on an already premade cover. On the first thread I went to, the user required a form. 

Many users have people submit a form to know what the people seeking their help want. A lot of users have people post “passwords” in their forms to, to make sure that they read the first post. So did this user, whose help I was seeking. 

Now, most users will list the forms that they would like right in their first post, such as: 

Title:

Subtitle: 

Author:

Password: 

This user didnt even have that in her first post. So I gave a friendly message, explained the font I’d like, and even uploaded my image in my comment so she’d already have it. Oh, and after bumping the thread repeatedly and not getting any requests in 16 hours of it being open, I thought that surely this artist would be rushing to make my cover. 

So, I wait an hour and check back to see that my request was denied. DENIED. I “didn’t use the form.” I scrolled back to the first post to find that I had to click a link that created a new window, which had a bunch of text around the standard form: (author, subtitle, title, ideas, password, etc.) 

I typed the whole form up nice and neat, only to find that I was denied AGAIN. Even though I was the only person there and thought I had the form right. Apparently, I had to copy and paste the text from the separate window into my post to make a fancy boarder show up around the text. 

Long story short: Forms are a great way to keep your requests organized, but you shouldn’t deny people if they don’t follow your form exactly the way you want. Obviously, if they’re being pushy or saying “I need a cover/critique” then yes, deny them. But don’t require a separate link and a fancy boarder or image, I even say don’t require a password. If they follow the rest of the form and are willing to give you that follow or whatever payment you requested, I’d say do the job. 

Yes, You CAN Get a Writing Job!

Hello all! For this week’s post I’ll be discussing something myself and probably many other writers have dealt with: getting a job/being told you couldn’t get a job. 

Numerous times I had other students and professors say, “A writing major? What are you going to do with that?” I had people tell me I wouldn’t get a job and that I was even living in a “pipe dream” for thinking I could get my foot in the door anywhere but the big city. 

Earlier this week I was offered a job, ten miles from my home here in Upstate New York, with a local company. Seven months after graduating college, I found a job in my field. 

Anyway, here’s a few tips on how to keep your head up in the job market: 

1. Don’t Completely Give Up

I’ll admit, I was on the brink of hopelessness after not finding anything even close to what I wanted to do a few weeks after graduating. I took breaks from job searching weeks at a time, but checked back every so often for new openings. 

2. Don’t Be Too Hard On Yourself

Even if you don’t feel like you meet the qualifications, apply! You never know what could happen. If the job is based on writing skills, just do your best! 

3. Focus On Yourself

A lot of us follow what our friends are doing on social media and can compare ourselves, especially if friends find a job in their field before us. Just remember, that’s their life! You’ll find success soon enough.