How to Stay Interested in Your Book

Imagine having a great idea for a book, but not necessarily planning out the whole thing. You’ve got your setting and main character, you know what is going to happen to them throughout the book, but you start writing and just don’t feel that same passion. This happened to me once, and I hope it never happens again.

Writing a book you’re not passionate about can be a total drag. Of course, if you have OCD about finishing your books like I do, you can’t just stop writing it. After suffering through the writing process of a book I didn’t feel connected to, I devised a list of five ways to change your book so that you can not only make it to that last-chapter finish line, but have fun getting there!

1. Go Outside Your Comfort Zone

There’s nothing more interesting than writing something you haven’t done before and have no idea about. It’s fun to research and then apply what you’ve learned into your book. In my current novel, Fangs and Fortune, my main character Taliah is an expectant mother. I chose to go this route because, well, I’ve never done it before! It’s helped me get excited about the book and learn about something I didn’t know much about.

2. Write About Something Close to You

Grief, loss, and trauma happens to everyone at some point in life. If you can’t think of a struggle for your character, try incorporating something that was difficult for you in life. Maybe they were bullied or had anxiety. Maybe they lost a loved one or were a victim of a crime. If your character shares the same experience, no one knows how they feel better than you.

3. It’s Okay to Change Course

My action story, Saving Flight 926, was originally going to be the thrilling tale of my main character Arabella, an aviation-obsessed 17-year-old, landing a plane full of people and becoming a hero. When the plane landed on page 30, I knew I had to have a different approach. The second half of the story describes her struggle with PTSD. If something isn’t working in your story, just try something else!

4. Bring Out Your Fun and Crazy Characters

Now I’m not talking actual characters here. I’m talking about real people. In high school, I loved incorporating people I knew into my stories (and sometimes still do). Bringing in people from your real life takes away the process of having to think of personalities for all your characters, and for me, was a ton of fun to write. I loved incorporating common things they said and their personality traits. Just be sure to have them go through a name change.

5. Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

We all like to think of ourselves as novel-writing geniuses. And then we hit writer’s block. After the plane landed in Saving Flight 926 and Arabella was home with her family, I had no idea what to do! So, I reached out to some friends for help. One said, “Why don’t you have her struggle with PTSD?” It was the “eureka” moment for me. I never even thought of that! I truly believe that it would have taken me so much longer to finish that book if it weren’t for the help from my friend. Friends and family help us when we’re stuck in life. They also help when we get stuck on books, so reach out to them!

 

 

Never Giving Up on Your Blog

For this weeks entry, I chose to stick with a more personal topic instead of an advice post. Well, not really too personal, but just not an advice post. It’s fun to change things up, right?

Over four months ago I started consistently blogging again, sitting down and writing  a post every Sunday, usually in the afternoon or night because I can never think of what to write. In that time I’ve gotten maybe ten new followers, an okay amount of likes, and so on. I’m honestly surprised that I haven’t given up and stopped updating on Sundays. This is probably one of the most consistent things I’ve done in my life.

Looking at the stats page and seeing days with no views, seeing posts get no likes at all, sharing my blog over social media and seeing no improvement-it’s difficult, and sometimes I question whether or not I should stop writing on here.

But I definitely won’t until something literally inhibits me from doing so. Just like with our stories, some posts will be more successful than others. My most popular post doesn’t even have anything to do with my blog. I mean, it is technically writing advice because it warns everyone that they shouldn’t write for the scam website University Primetime. It’s just like how an unexpected story we write can become so popular.

Giving up is something that writers literally just can’t do. If we don’t market ourselves or finish our work, we’re never going to get published and achieve that dream of walking into a bookstore and taking a book off the shelf with our name on the cover.

No matter how little views or likes you have, never give up on your blog. Never give up on writing consistently, sharing it, or constantly trying to improve it. Someday, you are going to write that post that will get a lot of attention. Will today be that day?

How to be a Great Wattpad Critic (In 5 Easy Steps) 

For this weeks post I’ll be focusing on something that has been a big part of my Wattpad journey: critiques. They’ve helped me not only teach others, but gain friends, followers, and feedback for myself. While it is tons of fun, being a Wattpad critic isn’t as easy as it sounds. Here are 5 steps to get your critic journey going, and going well.

1. Advertise! 

Wattpaders won’t know you’re a critic if you aren’t advertising! Head straight to the designated help thread and post an advertisement. Here’s mine, made from a simple photo editing app. Picture advertisements will help you stand out in a long thread. 


2. Ditch the Complicated Sign Ups

I’ve mentioned in past posts about how much I hate special forms when seeking help from other Wattpadders. Forget forms, special passwords, etc when having others request your service. Keep is short and sweet. Explain what you’re willing to help with and your payment. Don’t ask for story descriptions, titles, or say, “what you’re looking for help with” etc, either. I’m going to get real here. If you’re a critic, you should be helping with everything, not ignoring some things and pointing out others. 

3. Don’t Sugar Coat, but Don’t be Mean Either

ALWAYS be polite and honest when performing a critique. Even if the book is literally the worst thing you’ve ever seen and every sentence makes you want to rip your eyes out, don’t resort to saying things like, “this sucks.” But don’t only point out the positives either. Our job as critics is to help others improve their work. Even seasoned writers feel hurt when getting negative feedback. It’s part of the writing process. 

4. Always Re-Read Your Feedback

Having a sophisticated, grammatically correct feedback post or comment will not only improve your reputation with the author, but can even attract others to seek your feedback after seeing your post in the comments section. Always re-read your feedback before posting to make sure there are no errors, and to see that you’ve said everything you meant to. 

5. Respect the Author’s Feelings

Many times, authors will be very unhappy with even the slightest amount of negative feedback. They may say things like, “Thanks, but I disagree.” Or “Thanks for your feedback, but I’m not changing that.” And you know what, that’s OKAY. Never feel like you wasted your time doing a critique for someone who doesn’t want to listen right now. Eventually they may change their minds and fix their work, and your comment will still be there for reference. 

Get to the Point…of View! 

For this week’s post, I wanted to focus strictly on the point of view, or POV, in a story. Here’s the rundown of what options you have when writing, as well as some tips for how to execute them properly. 

These are four of the most common POV types: 

1. First Person

This is, as I’ve said before, my go-to when writing just about all of my stories. This POV is told from your main character (or characters if you change narration throughout your story). This narration uses “I” during a story. Just remember, while there’s no I in team, there is an I in First Person. 

2. Second Person

To cut to the chase, second person POV is “all about me!” And by me, I actually mean “you.” Second Person POV refers to the reader directly by using “you.” While it is technically uncommon, I’d love to write a book in second person. This narrative puts the reader directly into the action of the story. 

3. Third Person Limited

Third Person Limited is similar to First Person in the sense that you’re only following one character. However, the narrator refers to the character they’re following as he/she/they/their name. In this scenario, the narrator only knows as much as the author knows. 

4. Third Person Omniscient

I call this the “all-knowing” POV. The narrator knows everything going on with everyone, narrating again from the he/she/they perspective. The thoughts of every character are open to the reader instead of the thoughts of just one person. 

Tips to Remember: 

• Don’t suddenly change your POV mid-chapter with no transition

•If using narration from multiple characters, keep the transition of who is talking consistent (every other chapter, etc) 

• Stick to the plot: if you’re talking through different characters, make sure the storyline is continuing on