Illiteracy in America

Although it isn’t well-known, March is National Reading Awareness Month. Largely partnered with  an organization called ReadAloud, who aims to have each parent across the country read aloud to their child for 15 minutes a day, I believe the main goal of Reading Awareness Month is to bring awareness to illiteracy and when we can do to help those who are illiterate.

Illiteracy is an epidemic that I personally care about very much, especially as an author. In college, my sorority’s philanthropy was focused on literacy. We went into schools and worked with underprivileged children who had trouble reading. Illiteracy is something that needs to be talked about.

Here are some facts about illiteracy in the US that you may not know (via the Literacy Project Foundation):

  • 44 million adults can not read a simple story to their children
  • Approximately 50% of Americans can not read well enough to perform a simple task, like reading a product label
  • 20% of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage
  • 3 out of 4 people on welfare can’t read
  • 85% of juvenile offenders have trouble reading

We’re constantly reading, no matter where we are. It’s hard to imagine how different our world would be if we couldn’t read. Thankfully, there’s a lot that can be done.

What You Can Do To Help: 

  • volunteer to read at your local library
  • read to someone younger than you, like a sibling or children you babysit
  • donate the books you’ve finished reading to charities, like First Book, who give them to the underprivileged

I hope this post was able to open your eyes to the problem our country faces with illiteracy. We can all do our part to help those who cannot read.